Common causes of acne in adults

The American Academy of Dermatology (ADD) says acne can be particularly frustrating for adults, as what worked for you as a teen may now be useless, or make your blemishes worse. Some adults will continue to get breakouts well into their 40s and even 50s. And, it is possible to get acne for the first time as an adult – common in women undergoing menopause. Here are some of the common causes in adults:

Fluctuating hormones: A hormonal imbalance can result in breakouts. This is most common.

Around the time of your period;

During pregnancy, peri-menopause and menopause; and After discontinuing (or starting) birth control pills.

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Stress: Researchers have discovered a relationship between stress and flare-ups. In response to stress, our body tends to produce more androgens, which stimulate the oil glands and hair follicles in the skin, leading to breakouts. This is one of the reasons why, when we are under consistent stress, the breakouts seem to be more regular.

Family history: Dermatologists have found that some people may have a genetic predisposition to acne. If a blood relative, such as a parent, brother or sister, had

Article source: http://www.longevitylive.com/health-studies/expert-advice-body/common-causes-acne-adults/

New acne food pyramid targets simple carbohydrates

Acne food pyramid targets simple carbohydrates
Foods with a high-glycemic index–simple carbohydrates–can contribute to acne. (Shutterstock)

Before you go and spend any more money on infomercial acne products, make sure you are up-to-speed on the latest in dermatology research.

For years we’ve been told there is no universal cure for acne. Stress, hormones and the environment create such a complex skin scenario the best option we have is to try and control breakouts when they appear. If you grew up during the last several decades, you’ve probably also been told that diet doesn’t really have an influence on acne, even though rumors abound about eating too much chocolate or greasy foods.

SEE ALSO: Top 5 natural sugar substitutes

Modern research, however, continually shows the importance of diet in everything health-related, including acne. To showcase how foods do, in fact, influence acne breakouts, dermatologist Eric Schweiger, who runs Clear Clinic, an acne-focused dermatology practice in New York City, uses something called the acne food pyramid.

The pyramid is relatively simple, divided into two sections. At the top, in the smallest portion, are foods with a high-glycemic index like white rice, sugar, French fries, scones,

Article source: http://voxxi.com/2015/01/new-acne-food-pyramid/

New acne food pyramid targets simple carbohydrates

Acne food pyramid targets simple carbohydrates
Foods with a high-glycemic index–simple carbohydrates–can contribute to acne. (Shutterstock)

Before you go and spend any more money on infomercial acne products, make sure you are up-to-speed on the latest in dermatology research.

For years we’ve been told there is no universal cure for acne. Stress, hormones and the environment create such a complex skin scenario the best option we have is to try and control breakouts when they appear. If you grew up during the last several decades, you’ve probably also been told that diet doesn’t really have an influence on acne, even though rumors abound about eating too much chocolate or greasy foods.

SEE ALSO: Top 5 natural sugar substitutes

Modern research, however, continually shows the importance of diet in everything health-related, including acne. To showcase how foods do, in fact, influence acne breakouts, dermatologist Eric Schweiger, who runs Clear Clinic, an acne-focused dermatology practice in New York City, uses something called the acne food pyramid.

The pyramid is relatively simple, divided into two sections. At the top, in the smallest portion, are foods with a high-glycemic index like white rice, sugar, French fries, scones,

Article source: http://voxxi.com/2015/01/new-acne-food-pyramid/

Clinical Review: Acne

Section 1: Epidemiology and aetiology

Almost all teenagers can expect some degree of acne, with moderate to severe disease in about 15% of 15- to 17-year-olds.1 Acne develops earlier in girls, but more boys are affected. Late-onset acne (25 years) is seen in 8% of patients and significant lesions are seen in 1% of men and 5% of women at the age of 40.2

Aetiology
Genetic factors play a part. There is a high concordance between monozygotic twins and a greater risk of severity is associated with a positive family history, maternal acne being associated with the greatest risk.1,3

Acne is associated with increased insulin resistance and high serum dehydroepiandrosterone, which may explain its association with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

Abnormal androgen production is responsible for patients developing acne in Cushing’s syndrome, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, patients using anabolic steroids and virilising tumours in females.

Factors that can cause acne to flare include menstruation, emotional stress, picking and smoking.4

Antiepileptic drugs are associated with a monomorphic acneiform rash and it has been suggested the severity of the acneiform eruption produced by the chemotherapy drug erlotinib may correlate with increased survival.5

There is limited evidence to support the belief that diet affects acne. Anecdotally, sunlight can improve acne and

Article source: http://www.gponline.com/clinical-review-acne/dermatology/acne-rosacea/article/1330238

Adult acne treatments that are spot on

AT THE CLINIC 

The single most important thing you can do to keep acne under control is to have a good skincare routine.

This means using the right products for you, along with a range of topical treatments including intense pulsed light, microdermabrasion and chemical peels.

For milder breakouts, topical medications such as retinoid, derived from vitamin A, can significantly improve the skin. You will need a prescription from your doctor to get it.

SmartXide Laser will improve skin tone, boost collagen and fade acne scars. From £250 per treatment.

A glycolic peel once a month will help improve scarring and keep pores unblocked. From £60 per treatment.

If you’ve been left with acne scars, fat transfer or dermal fillers can even out the dents leaving a smoother complexion. From £200 per treatment.

SKINCARE SAVIOURS

When you’re shopping for acne products look for the following ingredients: Glycolic acid penetrates pores and dissolves the blockages that lead to spots.

Salicylic acid breaks up pore-clogging sebum and boosts cell turnover on the surface of the skin.

Benzoyl peroxide has an antibacterial effect that helps kill the bacteria that cause acne. Be sure to avoid the sun when you’re using it.

Sulphur acts as an antibacterial agent while cleansing pores and reducing inflammation.

Article source: http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/553538/adult-acne-spots-treatment

Researchers Find Link Between Aggressive Acne And Melanoma Risk

shutterstock_170660708In a recent study titled Teenage Acne and Cancer Risk in US Women: A Prospective Cohort Study, published in the Cancer Journal, a team of researchers from Harvard Medical School has found a link between teenage acne and an increased risk of developing hormone-related cancer, including melanoma.

Acne is one of the most common skin conditions during adolescence, affecting more than 85% of teenagers. There have been several hormones linked to acne, including androgens, estrogens, growth hormone, insulin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and melanocortins.

There are a significant number of cancers that are directly hormone related, such as breast, prostate, colorectal, lung cancer and melanoma. As such, the hypothesis that acne could be a predictor of cancer risk becomes plausible.

The research team analyzed data from 99,128 female nurses in the Nurses’ Health Study II cohort for 20 years (1989-2009) and used statistical models to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) of eight different cancers, including melanoma, for women who had a history of severe teenage acne.

The team found that in this particular group of women, the risk of developing melanoma significantly increased. Furthermore, they used an independent melanoma

Article source: http://melanomanewstoday.com/2015/01/21/researchers-find-link-aggressive-acne-melanoma-risk/

5 Things You Should Know About the Link Between Dairy and Acne

Most anyone who’s ever dealt with acne can relate to being desperate to find the answer to the problem. Sure, we’re told to avoid chocolate, chips, ice cream and cookies, but other than that, it’s just “because of our hormones” or due to stress, right? Not so, friends. If you’ve ever really got to the bottom of an acne problem, it’s likely due to traces of inflammatory foods in your diet that causes either a hormonal reaction or an inflammatory reaction. The most common complaints of allergenic reactions occur among dairy, wheat, and peanuts, and though not allergenic, sugar is also inflammatory and leads to acne as well. Though wheat and peanuts don’t lead to acne, they can cause some people to experience redness or dryness, though dairy can lead to just about all kinds of skin problems, including serious forms of acne.

Acne will not hurt you in any way, but it is your body’s way of telling you that it’s out of balance and your insides need some extra love. While acne can be common during puberty, it could possibly even be lessened by removing dairy in the diet during puberty (and what teenager isn’t

Article source: http://www.onegreenplanet.org/natural-health/the-dairy-and-acne-connection/

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